10 funny mockumentaries to remind us about the absurdity of life, Family-friendly Halloween films for boos big and small. u/maximumair97. We catch up to current day, with Akecheta holding wounded Maeve’s daughter and telepathically communicating with Maeve herself, presumably via the mesh network, assuring that he’ll take care of the girl. Score, setting and scope all swirl together behind McClarnon's masterful performance to create the most elegant episode of the series to date — one that took viewers' hearts with it as it went off the air. What did I miss? best top new controversial old … William's past stands revealed in this haunting hour, as viewers finally come to see how his wife died. Sort by. Here’s why the coronavirus outbreaks in the Dakotas got so bad. As story development goes, this isn’t bad, but it relies too heavily on us thinking Maeve might really perish, a victim of Delos’s disinterest in preserving anything but her rogue code, and I just don’t think for a second that Westworld is going to unceremoniously kill off its second lead. I grew to love Mauve even more.
She looks cautiously at the Man in Black, lying on the ground unconscious, but he tells her that he will not hurt her. The idea that the world is wrong has always been a potent one on this show, and season two has drifted from it just a tiny bit. Season two's second episode cleverly hops across time, beginning with the very first cold open of the series, as Arnold and Dolores are seen together in the outside world for the first time. But few anticipated that Ford's final plan was actually in concert, not conflict, with his old partner Arnold.

As much as the subsequent Arnold reveal clarifies the show's mythology, it pales in comparison to the first big Bernard bombshell: Not only is this host-studying scientist actually a host himself, he also follows the discovery of his true nature by being ordered by Ford to murder Theresa (Sidse Babett Knudsen), Bernard's lover. That made for some gorgeous images — Maeve confronting the maze in the dust chief among them — but the way that Westworld can feel a little schematic, like assembling a piece of furniture where it’s not quite clear how everything fits together until the end, is heavily tied to this sort of planning. I even liked the sense that Ghost Nation had adapted the circumstances of what happen to hosts after they die into its mythology. “The ‘Jack’s tattoo’ episode of Westworld,” snarked another, referring to an infamous hour of Lost. While the reveal itself was a jaw-dropping moment, it's one of few scenes that stand out — the Shogun World street-level showdown notwithstanding. He’s apparently not on a tight loop interacting with guests. When you mix that with the idea of an episode about the Native American “Ghost Nation” hosts, performed almost entirely in Lakota, there are so many places where the whole enterprise could absolutely shatter into tiny pieces. (In a rather on-point criticism of Hollywood’s depiction of Native Americans as “The Other,” Akecheta is at one point programmed to be more “brutal… dehumanized.… [We] want the guests to feel better when they’re kicking his ass.”). At this point, the only thing that could really redirect her course is to be faced with a direct threat that requires her to join forces, with the other hosts or the humans or both.

"The Stray" offers an example that falls firmly in the second category, as a stray host repeatedly bashes its own head in due to a glitch — one of the most absurd and unforgettable images of the series to date.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) stands at the center of some of the show's most breathtaking action scenes, and this episode is no different. The enigmatic gunslinger gets himself thrown into prison, with the express purpose of busting out Hector Escaton (Rodrigo Santoro). This season had a really slow and meandering start in the first half, but now it has reached the quality of season 1 in the last few episodes (apart from Dolores.
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10 funny mockumentaries to remind us about the absurdity of life, Family-friendly Halloween films for boos big and small. u/maximumair97. We catch up to current day, with Akecheta holding wounded Maeve’s daughter and telepathically communicating with Maeve herself, presumably via the mesh network, assuring that he’ll take care of the girl. Score, setting and scope all swirl together behind McClarnon's masterful performance to create the most elegant episode of the series to date — one that took viewers' hearts with it as it went off the air. What did I miss? best top new controversial old … William's past stands revealed in this haunting hour, as viewers finally come to see how his wife died. Sort by. Here’s why the coronavirus outbreaks in the Dakotas got so bad. As story development goes, this isn’t bad, but it relies too heavily on us thinking Maeve might really perish, a victim of Delos’s disinterest in preserving anything but her rogue code, and I just don’t think for a second that Westworld is going to unceremoniously kill off its second lead. I grew to love Mauve even more.
She looks cautiously at the Man in Black, lying on the ground unconscious, but he tells her that he will not hurt her. The idea that the world is wrong has always been a potent one on this show, and season two has drifted from it just a tiny bit. Season two's second episode cleverly hops across time, beginning with the very first cold open of the series, as Arnold and Dolores are seen together in the outside world for the first time. But few anticipated that Ford's final plan was actually in concert, not conflict, with his old partner Arnold.

As much as the subsequent Arnold reveal clarifies the show's mythology, it pales in comparison to the first big Bernard bombshell: Not only is this host-studying scientist actually a host himself, he also follows the discovery of his true nature by being ordered by Ford to murder Theresa (Sidse Babett Knudsen), Bernard's lover. That made for some gorgeous images — Maeve confronting the maze in the dust chief among them — but the way that Westworld can feel a little schematic, like assembling a piece of furniture where it’s not quite clear how everything fits together until the end, is heavily tied to this sort of planning. I even liked the sense that Ghost Nation had adapted the circumstances of what happen to hosts after they die into its mythology. “The ‘Jack’s tattoo’ episode of Westworld,” snarked another, referring to an infamous hour of Lost. While the reveal itself was a jaw-dropping moment, it's one of few scenes that stand out — the Shogun World street-level showdown notwithstanding. He’s apparently not on a tight loop interacting with guests. When you mix that with the idea of an episode about the Native American “Ghost Nation” hosts, performed almost entirely in Lakota, there are so many places where the whole enterprise could absolutely shatter into tiny pieces. (In a rather on-point criticism of Hollywood’s depiction of Native Americans as “The Other,” Akecheta is at one point programmed to be more “brutal… dehumanized.… [We] want the guests to feel better when they’re kicking his ass.”). At this point, the only thing that could really redirect her course is to be faced with a direct threat that requires her to join forces, with the other hosts or the humans or both.

"The Stray" offers an example that falls firmly in the second category, as a stray host repeatedly bashes its own head in due to a glitch — one of the most absurd and unforgettable images of the series to date.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) stands at the center of some of the show's most breathtaking action scenes, and this episode is no different. The enigmatic gunslinger gets himself thrown into prison, with the express purpose of busting out Hector Escaton (Rodrigo Santoro). This season had a really slow and meandering start in the first half, but now it has reached the quality of season 1 in the last few episodes (apart from Dolores.
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Captivated, he begins carving the pattern into the scalps of dead hosts, a tattoo that gets put into circulation among the hosts. Close. A lyrical, emotional journey through the history of one character knits together some of the show’s most persistent mysteries. Of course, his framing of the narrative could well be false, especially given what we see of Maeve at the end of the episode. It's one of the show's very best examples of how absolutely the park corrupts its inhabitants, as masterfully rendered by Harris' Man in Black. But ultimately, even when I noticed the lagging pace and the redundancy of the exposition, I just didn’t care because I was enjoying the characterization and the emotional impact of the story so much. 78% Upvoted. Offers may be subject to change without notice.

Of course, this could also be a feeble attempt on my part to play Westworld’s game of catering to its subreddit. Millions rely on Vox’s explainers to understand an increasingly chaotic world. I haven’t quite been able to escape the idea that the show thinks its core audience is everybody who reads the Westworld subreddit. The grand scale of the season ender is worthy of all the praise in the world, but the creative minds behind the series would be wise to acknowledge the copious amounts of cortical fluid leaking from many fans' ears.
John P. Johnson/HBO. After wondering all season long about the park's mysterious co-founder Arnold, who died many years before the present events of the series, viewers discovered that the man was staring them in the face all this time (Wright, pulling double duty as both Bernard and Arnold). It also offers a couple of terrific scenes, including a nighttime meeting between Akecheta (Zahn McClarnon) and Ford (Anthony Hopkins) that takes place amid a gruesome tableau of Ghost Nation hosts frozen in place and has more of the horror and eeriness of the “creation meeting the creator” feeling the show strives for than almost any other scene of its ilk. I’m glad it had such centrality here, and even if I’m not sure why Maeve and Akecheta are teaming up, I’m glad they are.

This is the very best episode of Westworld through two seasons — and it's really not close. But “Kiksuya” has the visceral emotion that the series often lacks, and McClarnon is a terrific leading man. Next week: A far more traditional Westworld that sets the stage for the season finale and contains one of the show’s darkest twists yet. Creators Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy have unleashed 20 episodes of Westworld upon the world, serving up enough violent delights to send viewers into a cortical meltdown. This writer does not count himself among that crowd. On the heels of "The Passenger," the 90-minute season two finale, fans have never had a better sense of what to expect from the HBO drama's future, thanks to a clear sense of its past. Entertainment Weekly may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Chip in as little as $3 to help keep it free for everyone. The big Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) reveal in episode seven is a tough act to follow. Not a dry eye in the house on that particular Sunday night. What did you think? Showrunners Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy have discussed how the show explores the tension between abhorring real-life violence and enjoying television violence. There's no question that the season two finale was positively epic, a game-changer in the truest sense. Todd VanDerWerff: “Kiksuya” could have — and probably should have — gone so, so wrong. A table-setter of the highest order, "Journey Into Night" not only establishes the new status quo for the park and its inhabitants, but also sets the stage for the season's narrative framing device: an amnesiac Bernard, lost in his memories, somehow the key to unlocking a great mystery.

10 funny mockumentaries to remind us about the absurdity of life, Family-friendly Halloween films for boos big and small. u/maximumair97. We catch up to current day, with Akecheta holding wounded Maeve’s daughter and telepathically communicating with Maeve herself, presumably via the mesh network, assuring that he’ll take care of the girl. Score, setting and scope all swirl together behind McClarnon's masterful performance to create the most elegant episode of the series to date — one that took viewers' hearts with it as it went off the air. What did I miss? best top new controversial old … William's past stands revealed in this haunting hour, as viewers finally come to see how his wife died. Sort by. Here’s why the coronavirus outbreaks in the Dakotas got so bad. As story development goes, this isn’t bad, but it relies too heavily on us thinking Maeve might really perish, a victim of Delos’s disinterest in preserving anything but her rogue code, and I just don’t think for a second that Westworld is going to unceremoniously kill off its second lead. I grew to love Mauve even more.
She looks cautiously at the Man in Black, lying on the ground unconscious, but he tells her that he will not hurt her. The idea that the world is wrong has always been a potent one on this show, and season two has drifted from it just a tiny bit. Season two's second episode cleverly hops across time, beginning with the very first cold open of the series, as Arnold and Dolores are seen together in the outside world for the first time. But few anticipated that Ford's final plan was actually in concert, not conflict, with his old partner Arnold.

As much as the subsequent Arnold reveal clarifies the show's mythology, it pales in comparison to the first big Bernard bombshell: Not only is this host-studying scientist actually a host himself, he also follows the discovery of his true nature by being ordered by Ford to murder Theresa (Sidse Babett Knudsen), Bernard's lover. That made for some gorgeous images — Maeve confronting the maze in the dust chief among them — but the way that Westworld can feel a little schematic, like assembling a piece of furniture where it’s not quite clear how everything fits together until the end, is heavily tied to this sort of planning. I even liked the sense that Ghost Nation had adapted the circumstances of what happen to hosts after they die into its mythology. “The ‘Jack’s tattoo’ episode of Westworld,” snarked another, referring to an infamous hour of Lost. While the reveal itself was a jaw-dropping moment, it's one of few scenes that stand out — the Shogun World street-level showdown notwithstanding. He’s apparently not on a tight loop interacting with guests. When you mix that with the idea of an episode about the Native American “Ghost Nation” hosts, performed almost entirely in Lakota, there are so many places where the whole enterprise could absolutely shatter into tiny pieces. (In a rather on-point criticism of Hollywood’s depiction of Native Americans as “The Other,” Akecheta is at one point programmed to be more “brutal… dehumanized.… [We] want the guests to feel better when they’re kicking his ass.”). At this point, the only thing that could really redirect her course is to be faced with a direct threat that requires her to join forces, with the other hosts or the humans or both.

"The Stray" offers an example that falls firmly in the second category, as a stray host repeatedly bashes its own head in due to a glitch — one of the most absurd and unforgettable images of the series to date.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) stands at the center of some of the show's most breathtaking action scenes, and this episode is no different. The enigmatic gunslinger gets himself thrown into prison, with the express purpose of busting out Hector Escaton (Rodrigo Santoro). This season had a really slow and meandering start in the first half, but now it has reached the quality of season 1 in the last few episodes (apart from Dolores.

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